Al Yasa Khan

Al Yasa Khan

Parallel Histories teaches us disagreements are inevitable, but that does not prevent us from understanding the other, and engaging in civil debate. It is not there to tell you right from wrong, but rather to give you the tools to make that decision for yourself. In doing so, you find the humanity of both sides and that humanity, no matter what position you take in the end, is the one element that you will share with anyone, no matter whether you agree or disagree.

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Theo Cohen

Theo Cohen

I am a French teacher of History and Geography from Lyon.

I have graduated from two Masters programs, one in International Relations at the University of Lyon, the other in Geopolitics at the French Institute of Geopolitics in Paris, and completed part of my studies in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel. I wrote my master’s thesis on the challenges and future prospects of the Israeli-Jordanian relationship.

As a high school teacher, I am regularly challenged by my students' views, passion and sensitivities whilst teaching the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Traditional history textbooks have proved unsatisfactory as they aim to achieve an external "balanced view", leaving out the historically-rooted perceptions underlying the protagonists' actions in the process. Furthermore, teachers may lack the training and tools to tackle this contentious topic.

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Noor Alzaghel

Noor Alzaghel

I have always been curious about how non-Arabs view the Arab world and Arabs view the non-Arab world. There seems to be a long history of misunderstanding. This was why I wanted to be involved with researching for Parallel Histories. My first assignment is the history of the Second Intifada and my particular role is to find Arabic source materials which a non Arabic speaker would not have access to.

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